Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Psalm 119:65-80 KJV -- Teth & Jod


What It Says:

Psa 119:65  TETH. Thou hast dealt well with thy servant, O LORD, according unto thy word.
Psa 119:66  Teach me good judgment and knowledge: for I have believed thy commandments.
Psa 119:67  Before I was afflicted I went astray: but now have I kept thy word.
Psa 119:68  Thou art good, and doest good; teach me thy statutes.
Psa 119:69  The proud have forged a lie against me: but I will keep thy precepts with my whole heart.
Psa 119:70  Their heart is as fat as grease; but I delight in thy law.
Psa 119:71  It is good for me that I have been afflicted; that I might learn thy statutes.
Psa 119:72  The law of thy mouth is better unto me than thousands of gold and silver.
Psa 119:73  JOD. Thy hands have made me and fashioned me: give me understanding, that I may learn thy commandments.
Psa 119:74  They that fear thee will be glad when they see me; because I have hoped in thy word.
Psa 119:75  I know, O LORD, that thy judgments are right, and that thou in faithfulness hast afflicted me.
Psa 119:76  Let, I pray thee, thy merciful kindness be for my comfort, according to thy word unto thy servant.
Psa 119:77  Let thy tender mercies come unto me, that I may live: for thy law is my delight.
Psa 119:78  Let the proud be ashamed; for they dealt perversely with me without a cause: but I will meditate in thy precepts.
Psa 119:79  Let those that fear thee turn unto me, and those that have known thy testimonies.
Psa 119:80  Let my heart be sound in thy statutes; that I be not ashamed.


What It Means:

GOD’S WORD IS PRICELESS / COUNTING MY BLESSINGS
 
Psa 119:65  TETH. Thou hast dealt well with thy servant, O LORD, according unto thy word.

Define: Dealt --  have the charge of, executed, exercised, furnished, gathered, governed, granted, hindered, held, kept, maintained, offered, prepared, provided, served, spent, bestowed, brought forth,

Our psalmist says that God has dealt well – or blessed – him. He is happy to know God. He has placed himself under the mighty hand of God, and God has cared for him, provided for him, kept him from some things, and blessed him with others. He is not specific, except to say that God promised to bless him (according unto thy word), and then accomplished it. He praised God and speaks directly to him: O LORD.

Believer’s Bible Commentary (BBC): How long is it since I have thanked the LORD for the wonderful way He has treated me according to the promise of His word? "Count your blessings: name them one by one; and it will surprise you what the Lord has done!"

Psa 119:66  Teach me good judgment and knowledge: for I have believed thy commandments.

What two things does he ask God to teach him? Good judgment and knowledge.

Why? for I have believed thy commandments

Pro 9:9-11  Give instruction to a wise man, and he will be yet wiser: teach a just man, and he will increase in learning.  The fear of the LORD is the beginning of wisdom: and the knowledge of the holy is understanding. For by me thy days shall be multiplied, and the years of thy life shall be increased

To have good judgment is to be given the ability, by the gift of God, to be able to assess a situation and prayerfully choose the best course -- which is the course that God would prefer that he take. Knowledge of God is what good judgment is based on. Knowledge of God’s word, His precepts, His laws, His instruction and testimonies, but, most of all, having knowledge of Who God Is.

What does he say he has believed? Thy commandments

He reminds God (who needs no reminders) in his prayer that he has “believed thy commandments.” He has believed that God gave the commandments, believed that God’s commandments are trustworthy, and believed enough to obey and follow them. We know this is a new venture for our psalmist because of the following verse:

Psa 119:67  Before I was afflicted I went astray: but now have I kept thy word.


What had he done before he was afflicted? He went astray

But what is he doing now?  Now have I kept thy word

He has repented from going astray or away from God’s word. Going astray brings affliction with it. But now he has changed his ways and has begun to keep God’s word.

Mar 1:14-15  Now after that John was put in prison, Jesus came into Galilee, preaching the gospel of the kingdom of God, And saying, The time is fulfilled, and the kingdom of God is at hand: repent ye, and believe the gospel.

In Mar 1:14-15 above, Jesus is preaching in Galiliee to believers – the Israelites – and telling them that the kingdom of God is near and at hand and their response should be to repent and believe the gospel He is preaching. Which is what our psalmist has done. This is a new walk for our psalmist. He is currently still afflicted, but he has been reminded of God’s commandments and is trying to correct the situation and repair the damage that he did to his life. He has turned his life once again over to God.

Psa 119:68  Thou art good, and doest good; teach me thy statutes.

What does he say about God? You are good, and You do good

Our going astray always leads to a dead end, but God, being good, can and does affect all things for good.

Rom_8:28  And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to his purpose.

Jas_1:17  Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above, and cometh down from the Father of lights, with whom is no variableness, neither shadow of turning.


What does he ask to be taught? Thy statutes.

We begin to draw closer to God by the study of His word. He asks God to teach him His statutes. We know that we learn about God through the gift of His Holy Spirit, and we also gain understanding through the same gift. We can only be taught God’s statutes by Him, and then we can only live for God, in Christ, through faith and by His Spirit but we must take His book, open it, pray, and read.

Psa 119:69  The proud have forged a lie against me: but I will keep thy precepts with my whole heart.

What have the proud done? They have forged a lie against me.

Define: Forged – form, build, create, fashion, falsify, counterfeit, fake, copy

What shall our psalmist do in return?  But I will keep thy precepts with my whole heart

Remember the word “but” cancels out the first part and replaces it with the second. He disregards the lie forged against him in favor of regarding and keeping the precepts of the Lord with “my whole heart.” He does not let his focus on God be distracted by their outrageously bad behavior. He does not return evil for evil. He leaves everything in God’s hands.

Psa 119:70  Their heart is as fat as grease; but I delight in thy law.

The heart of the proud is like what?  Fat as grease.

The hearts of the proud refuse to believe God. They “wax gross” or “grow fat” by consuming falsehoods. Our psalmist actually says “their heart is as fat as grease.” Grease is oily, which implies they have oily, or slippery hearts. When confronted with the truth, they deflect, and side step, to slip out of the grasp of truth.

But what does our psalmist do in response to the greasy hearted?  But I delight in thy law.

He does not do anything in response to the greasy hearted. He turns completely away from them and looks to God’s law with delight.

Psa 119:71  It is good for me that I have been afflicted; that I might learn thy statutes.

What does he say is good for him? That I have been afflicted.

He concludes that his affliction has been good for him probably because his pain has opened his eyes to the real direction of his own life and motivated him to return to the Lord.

What reason does he give? That I might learn thy statutes.

He is saying that if he had not been afflicted he might not have learned God’s statutes and he is grateful for the training from God. So, out of his affliction, he learned a good thing and asks God for the opportunity to learn His statutes!!

Psa 119:72  The law of thy mouth is better unto me than thousands of gold and silver.

He is talking about value!! What does he value most?  The law of thy mouth.

What does he say God’s law is better than?  Thousands of gold and silver.

“The law of thy mouth” affects his life in far better and richer ways than mere money could ever do. God’s law gives us the proper boundaries and explains life and living in this world. Knowing God is the greatest treasure.

Mat 6:21  For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also.

It is the state of the heart that gives us quality of life. Think about “The law of thy mouth.” God is always good and good to us. The words He speaks have power to accomplish His desires and are the law of the universe and mankind.

The Biblical Illustrator:

I. God’s Word secures a higher culture. It gives a freedom and a force to the intellect, a depth and a purity to the sympathies, a sensibility to the conscience, an invincibility to the purpose, a refinement to the tastes, a penetration to the eye, and a pinion (restraint) to the imagination, that no other appliances on this earth can furnish.

II. God’s Word invests with a higher power. Wealth cannot impart magnanimity, fortitude, courage; but the Word of God does to the highest degree. It enables the soul to glory in tribulation, and to welcome death with rapture.

III. God’s Word opens up higher enjoyments. Wealth cannot give the enjoyment of an approving conscience, a loving spirit, an ever-brightening future, and the friendship of the everlasting Father.

IV. God’s Word connects with a higher world. The gold and silver of all the earth can form no connection between us and the celestial state, can procure us no admission into the heavenly world. “Naked came we into the world,” etc. But the Word of God abides in us, goes with us as our light and our sanctuary. (Homilist.)

The Biblical Illustrator: Application –

1.    Bless God for His precious Word. Next to Jesus and the Holy Spirit His greatest gift to man.

2.    Prize and revere it. Set your hearts upon it.

3.    Seek to be greatly enriched with it. Covet much of it... Lay it up. Dig for it.

4.    Use it. Apply it to your diversity of condition. It is profitable for all seasons and circumstances.

5.    What shall be the end of those who neglect the Gospel of Christ? (J. Burns, D. D.)


Luk_8:15  But that on the good ground are they, which in an honest and good heart, having heard the word, keep it, and bring forth fruit with patience.

Col_3:16  Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly in all wisdom; teaching and admonishing one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing with grace in your hearts to the Lord.

1Ti_6:17  Charge them that are rich in this world, that they be not highminded, nor trust in uncertain riches, but in the living God, who giveth us richly all things to enjoy;


INSIGHTS THROUGH THE WORD

Psa 119:73  JOD. Thy hands have made me and fashioned me: give me understanding, that I may learn thy commandments.

What does he want God to give him?  Understanding.

Why? That I may learn thy commandments

Define: Understand – comprehend, be familiar with, grasp, take in, get the picture, see, absorb, appreciate, know, recognize, comprehend, realize, be aware of, value, identify with

Jas 1:5  If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally, and upbraideth not; and it shall be given him.

We may pray for understanding of God’s word and God may reach down inside us by His Holy Spirit to give us understanding. Once we are given understanding then we can learn His commandments, and not only learn them, but by His Spirit we are enabled to obey God’s word, too. If we understand God’s word then we appreciate, and grasp it. After we absorb God’s word, we desire to live by it.

 “Thy hands have made me and fashioned me.”  With these words he acknowledges God as his creator, and humbles himself under the mighty hand of God. God created us all, but fashioned each one for his own purpose. We are not all carbon copies of each other.

Define: Fashioned – shaped, bent, twisted, formed, created, produced

Rom_9:21  Hath not the potter power over the clay, of the same lump to make one vessel unto honour, and another unto dishonour?

Psa 119:74  They that fear thee will be glad when they see me; because I have hoped in thy word.

Who will be glad when they see him?  They that fear thee.

Why? Because I have hoped in thy word.

Psa 130:7  Let Israel hope in the LORD: for with the LORD there is mercy, and with him is plenteous redemption.

He is picturing a glad reunion with his fellow believers and looks forward to giving a good report of his hope in God’s word. He has hoped in God’s word and He has walked the path of “not knowing” but now with his new resolve he has fresh hope in God who does not disappoint.

BBC: There is keen spiritual refreshment in meeting a Christian who is on fire for the Lord Jesus. Those who hope in God's Word become radioactive with the Holy Spirit.

Psa 119:75  I know, O LORD, that thy judgments are right, and that thou in faithfulness hast afflicted me.

What is the first thing he knows about the Lord? Thy judgments are right.

God never makes a wrong judgment. He sees things clearly throughout all eternity. God always says the right thing at the right time.

In what had God afflicted him? In faithfulness.

God is not only always right, he is always faithful.

Deu_7:9  Know therefore that the LORD thy God, he is God, the faithful God, which keepeth covenant and mercy with them that love him and keep his commandments to a thousand generations;

Albert Barnes’, Notes on the Bible: In faithfulness to my soul; in faithfulness to my own best interest. It was not arbitrary; it was not from malice; it was not that the affliction had come by chance; it was because God loved his soul, and sought his welfare. It was because God saw that there was some good reason why it should be done; that there was some evil to be checked; some improper conduct to be corrected; some lesson which he would be the better for learning; some happy influence on his life here, and on his happiness in heaven, which would be more than a compensation for all that he would suffer.

He trusts in God’s judgment and decisions and knows that God is eternally good and trustworthy, even when he is going through a trial. God never changes!

Keil and Delitzsch, Commentary on the Old Testament: He knows that God's acts of judgment are pure righteousness, i.e., regulated by God's holiness, out of which they spring, and by the salvation of men, at which they aim; and he knows that God has humbled him ... being faithful in His intentions towards him; for it is just, in the school of affliction, that one first learns rightly to estimate the worth of His word, and comes to feel its power.

Psa 119:76  Let, I pray thee, thy merciful kindness be for my comfort, according to thy word unto thy servant.

K&D: But trouble, though sweetened by an insight into God's salutary design, is nevertheless always bitter; hence the well-justified prayer… that God's mercy may notwithstanding (apart from his affliction) be bestowed upon him for his consolation, in accordance with the promise which (has) become his

What does he pray for? That thy merciful kindness may be for my comfort. Oh, let me take comfort in thy merciful kindness.

According to what? According to thy word unto thy servant.

Who was this word given unto? Thy servant. Himself. The writer of the Psalm.

BBC: … in ourselves we are weak as dust, and we need His compassionate love to sustain us. "Let us therefore come boldly to the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy and find grace to help in time of need" (Heb_4:16).

Adam Clark’s, Commentary on the Bible: Thy merciful kindness - Let me derive my comfort and happiness from a diffusion of thy love and mercy, ... thy exuberant goodness, through my soul.


Psa_23:4  Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me; thy rod and thy staff they comfort me.

Psa_71:21  Thou shalt increase my greatness, and comfort me on every side.


Our comfort comes from God’s merciful kindness that we find in His word, and that He fills us with by His Holy Spirit.

Psa 119:77  Let thy tender mercies come unto me, that I may live: for thy law is my delight.

What does our psalmist want to come unto him? Thy tender mercies.

Why? That I may live!!

The law is his what? Delight!

In verse 76 we see “Merciful kindness” – In verse 77 we see “Tender mercies” – synonyms for “Grace!”  We see his expectation of life everlasting because of his faith in the Lord’s mercy and grace and kindness to us!

Psa_73:26  My flesh and my heart faileth: but God is the strength of my heart, and my portion for ever.

Eph 2:4-9  But God, who is rich in mercy, for his great love wherewith he loved us, Even when we were dead in sins, hath quickened us together with Christ, (by grace ye are saved;) And hath raised us up together, and made us sit together in heavenly places in Christ Jesus: That in the ages to come he might shew the exceeding riches of his grace in his kindness toward us through Christ Jesus. For by grace are ye saved through faith; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God: Not of works, lest any man should boast.


Psa 119:78  Let the proud be ashamed; for they dealt perversely with me without a cause: but I will meditate in thy precepts.

Let the proud be what? Ashamed.

They (the proud princes) have dealt perversely with him and for no good honest reason (which they are incapable of because they are far from God).

Define: Perversely – defiantly, insolently, rebelliously, boldly, obstinately, stubbornly, determinedly, uncooperatively, awkwardly; (Antonym: compliantly, amenably)

The proud have sinned against him and he asks God to let them be ashamed for their perverse actions. Let them be ashamed for their non-belief in You, the Great God of Heaven!

What does our psalmist promise to do?  But I will meditate in thy precepts.

Here, again, we see an example of how to deal with perverse people in our lives. Step one: Pray for them to have their eyes opened (be ashamed) and pray for their salvation. If you don’t, who will?! Step two: meditate on God’s precepts. Recall a scripture that revives your spirit. Think about it, picture it strongly in your mind, and then praise God.

Notice that in verse 65 he talks about how God has dealt well with him and kept his promises.

Psa 119:65  TETH. Thou hast dealt well with thy servant, O LORD, according unto thy word.

And in verse 78 he talks about how the proud have dealt perversely with him

Psa 119:78  Let the proud be ashamed; for they dealt perversely with me without a cause: but I will meditate in thy precepts.

In either case He simply sticks with God and His word. This is how he returns good for evil unto the perverse, and praises God for His eternal goodness.

Psa 119:79  Let those that fear thee turn unto me, and those that have known thy testimonies.

Whom does he ask to be “turned unto me?”  1. Those that fear God and 2. Those that have known God's testimonies

He seems to be asking that his fellow believers not turn their backs on him. He needs them to trust that he is still one of them even when he is going through a trial.  He is also talking about opposites: 1. the proud, and 2. those that fear God and know his testimonies. These two are in two different camps. As believers we must gather around each other and support each other, especially in times of trouble.

K&D: God humbles, but He also exalts again according to His word; for this the poet prays in order that he may be a consolatory example to the God-fearing, to the confusion of his enemies.


Psa 119:80  Let my heart be sound in thy statutes; that I be not ashamed.

He asks God to let his heart be what? Sound in thy statutes

Define: Sound – good and whole, firm, unassailable, positive, reliable, sensible, watertight, whole, healthy, unblemished, perfect, normal, fit, sturdy

If he is sound in God’s word, then he will not be what? Ashamed.

Jamieson, Faussett & Brown Commentary: Let my (heart) be sound — that is, perfect, sincere (in thy statutes). – (that I be not) ashamed — disappointed in my hope of salvation.

Tit_2:7-8  In all things shewing thyself a pattern of good works: in doctrine shewing uncorruptness, gravity, sincerity, Sound speech, that cannot be condemned; that he that is of the contrary part may be ashamed, having no evil thing to say of you.

2Ti_1:7  For God hath not given us the spirit of fear; but of power, and of love, and of a sound mind.


Matthew Henry’s, Commentary on the Whole Bible: Here is,

1.    David's prayer for sincerity, that his heart might be brought to God's statutes, and that it might be sound in them, not rotten and deceitful, that he might not rest in the form of godliness, but be acquainted with the subject (thy statues) to the power of it - that he might be hearty and constant in religion, and that his soul might be in health.

2.    His dread of the consequences of hypocrisy: That I be not ashamed. Shame is the portion of hypocrites, either here, if it be repented of, or hereafter, if it be not: “Let my heart be sound, that I fall not into scandalous sin, that I fall not quite off from the ways of God, and so shame myself. Let my heart be sound, that I may come boldly to the throne of grace, and may lift up my face without spot at the great day.”

2Ti 1:12-14  For the which cause I also suffer these things: nevertheless I am not ashamed: for I know whom I have believed, and am persuaded that he is able to keep that which I have committed unto him against that day. Hold fast the form of sound words, which thou hast heard of me, in faith and love which is in Christ Jesus. That good thing which was committed unto thee keep by the Holy Ghost which dwelleth in us.


Read our verses once more:

Psa 119:65  TETH. Thou hast dealt well with thy servant, O LORD, according unto thy word.
Psa 119:66  Teach me good judgment and knowledge: for I have believed thy commandments.
Psa 119:67  Before I was afflicted I went astray: but now have I kept thy word.
Psa 119:68  Thou art good, and doest good; teach me thy statutes.
Psa 119:69  The proud have forged a lie against me: but I will keep thy precepts with my whole heart.
Psa 119:70  Their heart is as fat as grease; but I delight in thy law.
Psa 119:71  It is good for me that I have been afflicted; that I might learn thy statutes.
Psa 119:72  The law of thy mouth is better unto me than thousands of gold and silver.
Psa 119:73  JOD. Thy hands have made me and fashioned me: give me understanding, that I may learn thy commandments.
Psa 119:74  They that fear thee will be glad when they see me; because I have hoped in thy word.
Psa 119:75  I know, O LORD, that thy judgments are right, and that thou in faithfulness hast afflicted me.
Psa 119:76  Let, I pray thee, thy merciful kindness be for my comfort, according to thy word unto thy servant.
Psa 119:77  Let thy tender mercies come unto me, that I may live: for thy law is my delight.
Psa 119:78  Let the proud be ashamed; for they dealt perversely with me without a cause: but I will meditate in thy precepts.
Psa 119:79  Let those that fear thee turn unto me, and those that have known thy testimonies.
Psa 119:80  Let my heart be sound in thy statutes; that I be not ashamed.













Sunday, June 4, 2017

Restlessness and Its Remedy


I am still reading through "The Westminster Pulpit" which is a record of all the sermons of G. Campbell Morgan. I have found this man to be one of the most inspired of the men of God that I have come across. I am often touched and returned to the reality of my relationship with Jesus and the Father through the words that only God could have given him. I share this one with you because it addresses the question of the human heart. I hope you are touched as well, by the power of the Holy Spirit speaking to you.

(Chapter IV, "The Westminster Pulpit", Book 4)


Restlessness and Its Remedy

Who will shew us any good?     Psa 4:6

 By G. Campbell Morgan 

That is not the inquiry of the psalmist. It is a question which he quotes, in order that he may reply to it. Let us, therefore, read not only the inquiry but also the answer:—

There be many that say, Who will shew us any good?
Lord, lift Thou up the light of Thy countenance upon us.
Thou hast put gladness in my heart,
More than in the time when their corn and their wine are increased.
In peace will I both lay me down and sleep;
For Thou, Lord, only makest me dwell in safety.

"Who will shew us any good?" So far as we are able to judge from the pages of history, humanity is one in all ages. There are changes upon the great stream of human life, but they are surface changes; changes in manners and in methods, and even in the maxims of men; but underneath is the same human nature, asking the old questions, making the old complaints, and wondering with the old amazement. Humanity today is confronting the problems of long ago. In the process of the ages they come to the surface, and men attempting to answer them, find themselves again and again unable so to do, and decide presently that they will abandon the effort, and the problem sinks back in the tide and is forgotten. It reappears, and when it reappears we call it new, but "there is nothing new under the sun."

In the days of the Psalmist he said there were people who asked, "Who will shew us any good?" It is the language of a man who, looking back, is dissatisfied, looking around him is full of cynicism, and looking on is pessimistic. It is the language of restlessness and dissatisfaction. The question is being asked today by men in utterly different circumstances. Satiated men, overfull, full to repletion, come at last to the moment when they say, "Who will shew us any good?" Hungry men, conscious of the pinch of poverty and the pang of want, gaunt, desperate men say, "Who will shew us any good?"

Successful men, (using the word as the world uses it), men who seem never to have failed in any enterprise their hands have touched. We watch them as they climb from point to point, until at last we think of them as having achieved the most remarkable success, and then they come and sit by us and say, "Who will shew us any good?" "Vanity of vanity, all is vanity."

Men who have failed, for some reason we are never able to discover, there are men who always seem to fail; trial after trial, attempt after attempt, effort after effort, but always beaten, always a little lower, until at last with heartbreak they say, "Who will shew us any good?"

Is it not worth our attention that men in such opposite circumstances make the same inquiry? Does not that fact suggest that the inquiry is a revelation of some underlying malady which is independent of circumstances; the full man, the hungry man, the man successful, and the man of failure are alike disappointed. Let us hear their challenge. It is sounding in our ears on every side. This age is peculiarly restless. There is a hot feverishness manifest on every hand expressing itself in a thousand ways and with ever varying emphasis. I venture to say that you can express the whole of it in this old, simple, blunt language of my text, "Who will shew us any good?" Is life worth living?

Have we any answer to that inquiry? In reply to that inquiry concerning the inquiry, I would say at once, yes, we have an answer. The answer is as old as the inquiry. The answer lies here upon the page of this ancient psalm. While men may quarrel about the authorship and about the date, I am infinitely more interested to discover its consciousness of human unrest and its answer. Here is the answer:

Lord, lift Thou up the light of Thy countenance upon us.
Thou hast put gladness in my heart,
More than in the time when their corn and their wine are increased.
In peace will I both lay me down and sleep;
For Thou, Lord, only makest me dwell in safety.

Am I not right in saying that is an all-sufficient answer? Has not the consciousness of this congregation agreed as to the accuracy of that answer? "Who will shew us any good?" said the restless, feverish men of the psalmist's day, and he replied, the source of good I will declare, "Lord, lift Thou up the light of Thy countenance upon us"; the experience of good I will recount in your hearing,

Thou hast put gladness in my heart,
More than in the time when their corn and their wine are increased;

and finally, I will give you the result of this goodness, "In peace will I both lay me down and sleep." "Who will shew us any good?"

Is that the inquiry that was hot in your heart as you found your way to the sanctuary tonight, my brother? Is that the question you are asking, sister mine, after all the attempts to satisfy the craving of your fine nature with the things of dust and the excitements of the world? Tired, broken, disappointed, angry, cynical, do you say, Is life worth living?

I pray you listen in the sanctuary to this great answer, "Lord, lift Thou up the light of Thy countenance upon us," which being interpreted, may thus be explained. This man, and those of us who take our stand by his side in testimony, declare that we find good where God found it and finds it. If that declaration seems for the moment to wander a little away from the meaning of the Psalmist when he said, "Lift Thou up the light of Thy countenance," I beseech you keep that word in mind while I depart to a distance only that I may come back to it to discover its richest meaning and profoundest intention. We find good where God found it. Where did He find it? We read those old and familiar words in the first chapter of Genesis. I want you to be quite simple and like little children, and see what the first chapter of Genesis says. Light, the earth and the sea with all its myriad forms, the sun in the heavens in the daytime, and the silver queen of night, all the flowers, the birds of the air, and the fish in the sea, and the great creatures on the earth, and man; and God said these things are good. "Who will shew us any good?" Wherever you are you are near to some of these things. God says these things are good. Turn a deaf ear to the man who tells you they are evil. They are not evil. Do not believe the man who affirms that this is a wicked world. It is an absolutely untrue statement if by the world you mean the earth God created. These things are good. Light is good. The earth with its store of wonders is good. The deep and fathomless ocean of which the finest thing in literature is in the Bible, "Thy way was in the sea, And Thy paths in the great waters." The ocean is good. All the flowers and fruits of the earth, the fauna and flora of nature are good. The brightness of the sun, and the sunlight in either winter or summer; the radiance of the moon and the pictures she flings upon the sky as she plays with the clouds; these things are good. The fish in the sea, the fowls of the air, in every sense are good. You are living in the midst of these things and are saying, "Who will shew us any good?"

There is something wrong somewhere. Step a little higher and look once again at the Genesis picture. This time not at isolated items which in every case God pronounced good, which in every case rested the heart of God, and at last so rested Him that He hallowed the day of rest as a memorial of His own satisfaction with the things in the midst of which you live your life and I live mine. Climb a little higher and what are the conditions which are presented to your vision in this early chapter. The first is that of the supremacy and sovereignty of God. The second is that of the viceregal dignity of man. He is made a little lower than God, and is given dominion over all the creation beneath his feet. The third is that the creation potentially is waiting for the touch of men in fellowship with God to answer him in laughter and flowers, the abundance of harvest, yielding up to him the deep and profound secrets that lie within her bosom. If you will take one step higher and look no longer at isolated items, no longer at the condition, but look at the spiritual suggestiveness of this first chapter of Genesis with its picture of original conditions, what do you find? A picture of fellowship. A picture of cooperation. A picture of happiness. A picture of fellowship between man and God, and between man and everything beneath him; and therefore, between everything beneath man and God, through the instrumentality and mediation of man.

Man in rebellious selfishness shuts God out of his life. There is the tragedy of it all. As God is my witness, the last thing I desire to do is to speak in metaphor, or to look at dim and distant pictures. If you came here tonight saying, "Who will shew us any good?," the root trouble with you is that you do not know God. I will make that affirmation on the positive side. No truly Christian man or woman ever asks that question. The man or the woman who by grace has come into fellowship with God says, "Thou hast put gladness in my heart. More than they have when their corn and their wine are increased."

"In peace will I both lay me down and sleep:
For Thou, Lord, only makest me dwell in safety."

If you are hot and restless, unable to sleep, unable to find anchorage, crying out in the agony of your soul, "Who will shew us any good?" Is life worth living? The reason is that you have lost touch with Eden. You have lost consciousness of God.

Now some of my young friends are saying, We understand the reason for that very peculiar reading in Genesis, but why did you turn to Matthew? I read that old story of the baptism of Jesus, and of the word that came out of heaven, because there, in the Man of Nazareth coming to fulness of human life and just entering upon the ministry to which He was ordained, I find God's new resting place. If that sentence sounds a strange one let me tell you just what I mean. In Genesis, God saw that His creation was very good, and He rested; and then came the tragedy of rebellion, the tragedy of sin, and man lost his rest. When man lost his rest through sin, God lost His rest, and never found it again until He rested in His Beloved. "In Whom I am well pleased." Pleased with earth and air and sun and flowers and fish and fowl, the whole creation; pleased with man, but wounded in man's apostasy, God never found rest again, until He found satisfaction in the perfection of the humanity of Jesus. If you should be inclined to charge me with imaginative interpretation, I pray you hear me while I quote the words of Jesus upon a memorable occasion. Passing through the Bethesday porches, He saw a man who had been for thirty-eight years in the grip of infirmity. He healed him, and when men criticized Him for working a miracle on the Sabbath day, He answered, "My Father worketh even until now, and I work." You must interpret His word by His miracle. He claimed in that moment to be identified with God in activity, and what was the activity? It was activity in the presence of human limitation resulting from sin, the activity which wrought against the thing that spoiled until it was spoiled, and man remade.

But the earth when it was created did not yield up its secrets, did not sing its songs, did not come to the full manifestation of its potentialities. Man was there to discover its secrets under the guidance of God, to make it sing its songs, to bring its potentialities out into flower and glory. There are most curious notions abroad in the world about the garden of Eden. I have seen pictures of it. They are almost invariably pictures of impossible Italian gardens, through the wonderful pathways and amidst the curious flowers of which man is seen walking. I do not so read my Bible. I read, "The Lord God planted a garden eastward, in Eden," that is, fixed its habitation, marked its limitations, arranged its boundaries, and put man "into the garden of Eden to dress it and to keep it"; made him responsible for it, put him there that he might delve, in order that presently to his unutterable amazement and growing wonder, flowers might grow, and fruits might ripen; put him there that through the process of the cultivation of that planted garden, under the government of God, he should bring to light its hidden secrets. Every rose that blooms lies potentially in mother earth, but it never blossoms to perfection until man's hand has worked in cooperation with Divine power. That is the picture that I find in Genesis. It is a picture of fellowship and cooperation, and therefore of happiness. No one in Eden's garden said "Who will shew us any good?" God said it was very good; and man, yielding obedience to the throne of the Eternal, and exercising authority over everything beneath him, said, it is very good. There was no restlessness, no feverishness, no disappointment, until—ah me, that is the root of the malady—I leave the "until" incomplete.

You say, "Who will shew us any good?" God help you to see the tragedy of all this. It is not true of all of you. Some of you find perfect rest in one little plot of your garden because you find God in every blade of grass. "Who will shew us any good?" say they, and they cross the great Atlantic back and forth and play bridge and never see the beauties of the sea or listen to the anthem of the hurricane! They play cards ceaselessly, and then say, This voyage is very tiresome! "Who will shew us any good?"

Man out of harmony with God has lost the key to nature, and has lost the capacity for rest, and is hot and feverish and restless. The Man of Nazareth realized the first intention of God. In Genesis I read that man was given dominion over the fish of the sea and the fowl of the air and the secrets of the earth. In this Book of Psalms I find the question asked, "What is man that Thou art mindful of him?" Singing up out of the Psalmist's essential humanity came the answer,

Thou hast made him but little lower than God,
And crownest him with glory and honour.
Thou madest him to have dominion over the works of Thy hands,
Thou hast put all things under his feet.

But I cannot find that man, until I come to the gospel stories, and then the writer of the letter to the Hebrews quotes the ancient psalm and says, "We see not yet all things subjected to him. But we behold Him Who hath been made a little lower than the angels, even Jesus." If you watch Jesus at His work you will see the perfect Man mastering the secrets of nature. His miracles are attestations of His perfect humanity rather than demonstrations of His Deity.

Why do I linger here so long? Because to eyes that have ever looked upon the Son of God, the picture is full of glory and beauty. Yet I have another purpose. If in the things I have now endeavoured to say, you have caught a new consciousness of the perfection of the Man in Whom God found His rest, follow Him to the end, I pray you. What is the end of His life? The cross. What is the cross, "Who will shew us any good?" There He is, spoiled, mauled, murdered by men who ask that question. God came incarnate into the lives of the multitudes who had lost their vision of God, and "There is no beauty that we should desire Him." Therefore He was bruised and broken. "We did esteem Him stricken, smitten of God, and afflicted." We were wrong. "He was wounded for our transgressions, He was bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace was upon Him; and with His stripes we are healed." Incarnate God is upon the cross.

Is that the end? Is that the last word? By no means. Another man is hanging on a cross by His side, a thief, a robber, a malefactor. Out of the strange mystery of crucified iniquity there comes this weird and awful cry addressed to the central figure, "Jesus, remember me when Thou comest in Thy Kingdom." From the lips paling in death comes the regal answer, "Today shalt Thou be with Me in Paradise."

I see the first gleam, it is not the full light, but the first gleam, the accursed tree is the healing tree. The cross erected by man's sin is enwrapped in the Divine determination to save. By that sign of the cross, I know that all the tragedy is being dealt with, and that man can be remade. Behold Eden, and out of its ground came thorns, a curse upon man's sin. Behold the cross, and see the thorns are plaited into a crown bathed in blood on His brow. Coincidence do you say? There are no coincidences as accidents in the economy of God. Just as Mrs. Browning sang truly when she sang that the chaffinch implies the seraphim, so that crown of thorns reveals the way by which God deals with the malady, in order to bring man back into the consciousness of rest and of goodness. By that cross men may be repossessed of Eden.

Yes, you say, you mean that if a man shall trust in that cross he will find his way to heaven. I certainly do mean that, blessed be God, but I mean something else. I mean that by the way of the cross, by man's restoration through that cross into the place of fellowship with God upon the ground of sin forgiven, man can find his way into Eden here and now in this world. Do not let us be afraid of the simple illustrations with which we began, the light, the earth, the sea, the sun, the moon, the stars, the flowers, the birds; all the things of the earth; man can go back and find delight and rest in all these. You have often heard the saints singing it, and they mean it if they know the cross,

Heaven above is softer blue,
Earth beneath is softer green;
Something lives in every hue,
Christless eves have never seen.
Birds with gladder songs o'erflow,
Flowers with deeper beauties shine,
Since I know as now I know
I am His and He is mine.

"Who will shew us any good?" The Psalmist's answer is the only one—

"Lord lift Thou up the light of Thy countenance upon us." You have lost this world, because you have lost God. You find no rest in your own garden because you are out of fellowship with the God of the garden. You are tired of everything in this life because God made you for Himself, and you cannot satisfy the clamant cry of your deep, profound life apart from Him. It is quite impossible.

Shall we not get back to Him? You say, The journey is so long. No, there is but a step betwixt thee and God. At this moment, while the preacher is uttering his last words, and while the men and women who are sitting next you know nothing and can know nothing of the transaction, you can return to Him, and the light of His countenance will be lifted upon you, and the gladness that is greater than the gladness of plenty of corn and wine will fill your heart, and the peace of God which passeth all understanding will garrison your heart, because you are right with God. May He bring us to the trysting place in His grace, and constrain us to that return which means perfect rest.



Sunday, April 9, 2017

Psalm 119:49-64 KJV -- Zain & Cheth



What It Says:

Psa 119:49  ZAIN. Remember the word unto thy servant, upon which thou hast caused me to hope.
Psa 119:50  This is my comfort in my affliction: for thy word hath quickened me.
Psa 119:51  The proud have had me greatly in derision: yet have I not declined from thy law.
Psa 119:52  I remembered thy judgments of old, O LORD; and have comforted myself.
Psa 119:53  Horror hath taken hold upon me because of the wicked that forsake thy law.
Psa 119:54  Thy statutes have been my songs in the house of my pilgrimage.
Psa 119:55  I have remembered thy name, O LORD, in the night, and have kept thy law.
Psa 119:56  This I had, because I kept thy precepts.
Psa 119:57  CHETH. Thou art my portion, O LORD: I have said that I would keep thy words.
Psa 119:58  I intreated thy favour with my whole heart: be merciful unto me according to thy word.
Psa 119:59  I thought on my ways, and turned my feet unto thy testimonies.
Psa 119:60  I made haste, and delayed not to keep thy commandments.
Psa 119:61  The bands of the wicked have robbed me: but I have not forgotten thy law.
Psa 119:62  At midnight I will rise to give thanks unto thee because of thy righteous judgments.
Psa 119:63  I am a companion of all them that fear thee, and of them that keep thy precepts.
Psa 119:64  The earth, O LORD, is full of thy mercy: teach me thy statutes.

What It Means:

Psa 119:49  ZAIN. Remember the word unto thy servant, upon which thou hast caused me to hope. 

 REST AND COMFORT THROUGH THE WORD

What does the psalmist want the Lord to remember? The word unto thy servant.

What did God cause him to do? To hope.

The hope that God gave him was based on what? The word of God.

Believer’s Bible Commentary: It is not possible that God could ever forget His promise, but in the furnace of affliction, when faith has its lapses, we are permitted to pray, "Lord, remember . . ." "He cannot have taught us to trust in His name, and thus far have led us, to put us to shame."

The word that he wants to be remembered seems to have been a personal message that he received from the Lord. Sometimes the Lord speaks to us personally and individually. I remember the words that my Savior has spoken to me, personally, and they give me joy whenever I recall them, and they cause me to hope, also. When you heard God speaking to you, it could have been a particular passage in the Bible that really filled your heart with joy, or it could have been the Holy Spirit speaking inside you when you needed to hear from God. God communicates with us as He desires to and for our own good because He cares for us.

Psa 119:50  This is my comfort in my affliction: for thy word hath quickened me.

God spoke to him. God’s word caused him to hope. What did God’s word become to him? “My comfort in my affliction.” That is when we need comfort: when we are afflicted. Our psalmist has shown us that God’s word, which we have receive as our very own, becomes a comfort to us, especially in times of affliction.  

Define: Affliction – distress, suffering, difficulty, burden, problem, hardship, pain, trouble, misery, misfortune

What does he say God’s word hath done for him? Thy word hath quickened me.

We have run into this word “quicken” many times so far in this Psalm. We’ve looked up the definition over and over.

Define: Quicken – make living, make strong, to revive, live, nourish up, preserve (alive), quicken, recover, repair, restore (to life), save (alive, life, lives), surely, be whole 

God's word and His Holy Spirit give us life and revive us. Our Psalmist is showing us what our inner life could be like in Christ.

BBC: Those who have experienced the quickening powers of the word find it an unfailing source of comfort. The words of well-meaning men are often empty and unavailing but God's Word is always living, relevant and effective.

There is no comfort like quickening!! Quickening is a revival of the heart that God provides.

Define: Revive – recover, flourish again, revitalize, renew, perk up, breathe life into, restore, refresh, restart, stimulate, reinforce, reawaken, pick up, perk up, resume, develop, recuperate, resuscitate 

Act3:19  Repent ye therefore, and be converted, that your sins may be blotted out, when the times of refreshing shall come from the presence of the Lord;

To be quickened, to be revived, to be refreshed…. These all point to God’s love for us and that He is working in us and our lives.

Rom5:5  And hope maketh not ashamed; because the love of God is shed abroad in our hearts by the Holy Ghost which is given unto us.

Psa 119:51  The proud have had me greatly in derision: yet have I not declined from thy law.

What have the proud “had me greatly in?” Derision.

Define: Derision – mocking scorn, contempt and disdain, mockery, ridicule, contempt, disrespect (Antonym: approval)

The proud are those who have not humbled themselves under the mighty hand of God. They don’t know the Lord and so, do things their own way. They are the bullies of the world, who mock and scorn, and look down their nose at whatever they judge as “unfit.”

But what has our psalmist not done? Yet have I not declined from thy law.

He has not used the derision or  mockery of others as an excuse to disobey the law of God. He has not declined from thy law. This is what Jesus taught us, too.

Rom12:17  Recompense to no man evil for evil. Provide things honest in the sight of all men.

1Th5:15  See that none render evil for evil unto any man; but ever follow that which is good, both among yourselves, and to all men.

We call them “paybacks.” But paybacks are not how a true Christian should relate to those who do him or her wrong. We are meant to trust God in ALL circumstances. We are not to recompense evil for evil. What did Ghandi say? “An eye for an eye, and soon the whole world is blind.” We are to be good honest men and women all the time. We are to “ever follow that which is good” to all people.

This “ever follow that which is good” is sometimes easier said than done. We need a good example of how to accomplish this under stress. God has given us a prime example in the following verses about how David handled mockery from Shimei:

2Sa 16:11-14  And David said to Abishai, and to all his servants, Behold, my son, which came forth of my bowels, seeketh my life: how much more now may this Benjamite do it? let him alone, and let him curse; for the LORD hath bidden him. It may be that the LORD will look on mine affliction, and that the LORD will requite me good for his cursing this day. And as David and his men went by the way, Shimei went along on the hill's side over against him, and cursed as he went, and threw stones at him, and cast dust. And the king, and all the people that were with him, came weary, and refreshed themselves there.

How did David accomplish his obedience? By considering what the Lord was doing.

David was the king, yet he did not harm Shimei who cursed him, threw rocks and dust at him and his people. In a previous verse, Abishai had offered to go and cut off the head of Shimei but David, considered that God may have made the little man to do this. He did not want to go against God, and hoped that God would “look on mine affliction, and that the LORD will requite (repay) me good for his cursing this day.” David knew that God can make good things come from a bad situation. He did not return evil for evil, but trusted in the Lord’s goodness.

David accomplished his obedience by considering God’s point of view and remembering what he had been taught from the scripture:

Lev19:18  Thou shalt not avenge, nor bear any grudge against the children of thy people, but thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself: I am the LORD.

Psa 119:52  I remembered thy judgments of old, O LORD; and have comforted myself.

What has the psalmist remembered? Thy judgments of old, O Lord.

What did his memories provide for him? Comfort.

He has recalled what the Lord has done for him in the “old days” and he is once again comforted anew. Notice he says he has “comforted myself.” This too, we must do. We need the skill of comforting ourselves with our memories of what God and Jesus have done for us in the past. We can comfort ourselves with scripture and remembering God’s love for us. Remembering our trust in God, brings us comfort. We do not have to succumb to current unpleasantness, we can comfort our own selves with things that have comforted us in the past.

There is only one place from which comfort for the soul comes; and that is God. In the following scripture Jesus tells us about the Comforter (with a capital “C”).

Joh14:26  But the Comforter, which is the Holy Ghost, whom the Father will send in my name, he shall teach you all things, and bring all things to your remembrance, whatsoever I have said unto you.

Joh15:26  But when the Comforter is come, whom I will send unto you from the Father, even the Spirit of truth, which proceedeth from the Father, he shall testify of me:

Who is the Comforter?  The Holy Ghost.

Who sends Him to us?  The Father.

In whose name does He come? Jesus' name.

What is His job? To teach you all things and bring all the things that Jesus said to remembrance

The Comforter is also called? The Spirit of Truth.

From whom does He proceed? The Father.

Of what does He testify?  Of Jesus.

When the Holy Spirit speaks to us of Jesus, it brings comfort to our souls.

Psa 23:3  He restoreth my soul: he leadeth me in the paths of righteousness for his name's sake.

Psa 119:53  Horror hath taken hold upon me because of the wicked that forsake thy law.

What hath taken hold upon him? Horror.

Define: Horror – intense fear, a very strong feeling of fear, shock, or disgust; intense dislike, distress, or distaste; dismay, revulsion, shock, disgust, repulsion, dreadfulness, awfulness, terror (Antonym: delight)

He did not use the word “fear,” he used the word “horror” which is a triple dose of ordinary fear. He is shocked and disgusted!!

What caused him to have horror take hold of him?  The wicked.

What had the wicked done? The wicked forsake thy law.

He was completely shocked and disgusted that the wicked people had completely forsaken or thrown out God’s law! So far in this Psalm, our author has shared many times how he respects God’s testimonies, delights in God’s precepts, and obeys God’s law. He opened our eyes to the fact that it is God who comforts us. This is a way of life for him and when his peaceful life with the Lord suddenly collides with those who have no inkling of God nor His word – those who mock him, and God at the same time -- he is horrified by the very idea!! The strangeness of their behavior is unfathomable to him.

Define: Horrified – shocked, appalled, aghast, sickened, disgusted, revolted, dismayed, horror-struck
 
Psa 119:54  Thy statutes have been my songs in the house of my pilgrimage.

What have “Thy statutes” been to him?  My songs in the house of my pilgrimage.

BBC: Thanks to the wonderful Word of God, the pilgrim can sing in the house of his pilgrimage, or, as Knox put it, "in a land of exile." The way may be rough but it cannot be long. The night may be dark but God gives a song.

“Thy statutes” are “My songs”…. The thing that brings so much joy to his heart that he must sing praises to God are found in God’s word. He hopes, he rejoices in God’s word by singing it, and he finds comfort there in times of affliction. What a companion God has given us in His word. A companion that we can reach into and find solace, comfort, joy, praise, and hope at any time. Hallelujah!!

Psa 119:55  I have remembered thy name, O LORD, in the night, and have kept thy law.

What does he remember in the night?  He remembers “thy name, O LORD.” Have you ever done the same thing? As you lay on your pillow you think of Jesus and begin to feel the joy of knowing Him. Even His name is a comfort when you recall Him and what He has done for those whom he loves -- us!!

What does he say he has kept? Thy law.

Thinking of God and Jesus gives so much more comfort and peace, when we have been obedient.

1Jn3:20-21  For if our heart condemn us, God is greater than our heart, and knoweth all things. Beloved, if our heart condemn us not, then have we confidence toward God.

Our confidence in God increases as we become more and more obedient and humble to Him, and loving and kind to others.

Psa 119:56  This I had, because I kept thy precepts.

What did he have? He had a song of praise and worship. He remembered the name of the Lord, and was obedient to God. He had comfort in God.

Why did he have these things? Because I kept thy precepts.

Psa 119:57  CHETH. Thou art my portion, O LORD: I have said that I would keep thy words.

PERSEVERENCE IN THE WORD

What does he say the Lord is? My Portion.
 
Deu32:9  For the LORD'S portion is his people; Jacob is the lot of his inheritance.

When our psalmist speaks of a “portion” he is speaking of his inheritance. God is the most beautiful inheritance a human can have! Notice in our example verse that it says the Lord has a portion, too.

What is the Lord’s portion? His people.  Jacob is His lot, or inheritance.

Define: Lot – H2254, חבל, châbal, khaw-bal', From H2254; to wind tightly (as a rope), that is, to bind; specifically by a pledge – English: fate, fortune, outcome, end, future
 
A lot, as explained in Strong’s Concordance, is the twisting together of two things so they are bound together especially by a pledge. A pledge is a promise and when God makes a promise it comes to pass. What God wants is to be bound together with us; or he would not have given us promises to live by – or sent Jesus Christ to die on a cross for us. God is our lot; and we are His lot.

Jacob is God’s people, and they are the lot that fell to God, or his inheritance. So we see that it is a mutual inheritance or binding together. We inherit God, and God inherits us!! Truly this speaks of the deep relationship God desires with his children and the importance of keeping God’s words.

Rom 8:31  What shall we then say to these things? If God be for us, who can be against us?

Psa 119:58  I intreated thy favour with my whole heart: be merciful unto me according to thy word.

Define: Intreated – (entreat) – plead, implore, beg, pray, beseech, ask, request

Define: Favour – (favor) – preference, sympathy, approval, esteem, kindness, support, help, aid, benefit, increase

He prayed for God’s preference with what? My whole heart.

What did he specifically pray for? Be merciful unto me.

According to what? According to thy word.

God promises to be merciful when we seek Him…. And here is our psalmist asking for God’s mercy for himself.

Psa 119:59  I thought on my ways, and turned my feet unto thy testimonies.

What did he think on? My ways.

What did he do with his feet? He turned them towards God's testimonies.

This is saying that he thought about the things he was doing and decided to turn his back on those things. Instead, he has now turned his feet in the direction of God’s testimonies. He has decided to return to God and follow Him fully!! He is talking about repentance.

Psa 119:60  I made haste, and delayed not to keep thy commandments.

Define: Haste – speed, swiftness, rapidity, rush, hurriedness, quickness, acceleration (Antonym: slowness)

He hurried to repent. He did not delay to keep God’s commandments. In verse 59 we see that he had been wandering away, but he stopped himself short and thought about what he was doing and turned once again unto God’s ways in verse 60.

Psa 119:61  The bands of the wicked have robbed me: but I have not forgotten thy law.

“The bands of the wicked” are like “bands of thieves” a group of the wicked (those who do not obey God’s word) have attacked and robbed him!

But what did he not forget?   God's law.

Psa 119:62  At midnight I will rise to give thanks unto thee because of thy righteous judgments.

In the middle of the night he will get up to give thanks to God. Have you ever considered doing this? This is a good thing to do, on purpose, and even if you just wake in the night, remember to give thanks unto God!! Amen!

What reason does he give for giving thanks to God? Because of thy righteous judgments.

Psa 119:63  I am a companion of all them that fear thee, and of them that keep thy precepts.

He declares himself to be “a companion” – one who travels the same road.

Of whom is he a companion? 1. All them that fear God,  2.  All them that keep thy precepts.

We are all companions in Christ because we love the Lord and respect Him, and keep His precepts. This is why we address each other as brother or sister. We have joined the great cloud of witnesses and become traveling companions and co-participants with other believers in Christ. He says he is “a companion of ALL them that fear thee” – respect God, love God, obey God.

Gal3:28  There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither bond nor free, there is neither male nor female: for ye are all one in Christ Jesus.

1Co1:9  God is faithful, by whom ye were called unto the fellowship of his Son Jesus Christ our Lord.

1Jn1:3  That which we have seen and heard declare we unto you, that ye also may have fellowship with us: and truly our fellowship is with the Father, and with his Son Jesus Christ.

BBC: Those who love God love His people. And those who love the Bible love all Bible-lovers. It is a worldwide fellowship that transcends national, social and racial distinctions.

Psa 119:64  The earth, O LORD, is full of thy mercy: teach me thy statutes.

What does he say the earth is full of? God's mercy.

What does he request of the LORD?  Teach me thy statutes.

He does not want to miss out on any of God’s statues which is where we learn of God’s mercy. God’s love is infinite and the earth, O LORD, is full of thy mercy!! He is filled with the awe of God’s mercy and eager to learn more of Him!!

Expositions of Holy Scripture by Alexander MacLaren: Take first that thought of the rejoicing earth, full of God’s mercy as some cup is full of rich wine, or as the flowers in the morning are filled with dew. The Bible does not look at the external world, the material universe, from a scientific point of view, nor does it look at it from a poetical point of view, but from a simply religious one. Nothing that modern science has taught us to say about the world in the least affects this principle which the Psalmist lays down, that it is all full of God’s mercy. The thought is intended to exclude man and man’s ways and all connected with him, as we shall see presently, but the Psalmist looks out upon the earth and all the rest of its inhabitants, and he is sure of two things: one, that God’s direct act is at work in it all, so as that every creature that lives, and everything that is, lives and is because God is there, and working there; and next, that everything about us is the object of loving thoughts of God’s; and has, as it were, some reflection of God’s smile cast across it like the light of flowers upon the grass. Spring days with life ‘re-orient out of dust,’ and the annual miracle beginning again all round, with the birds in the trees, that even dwellers in towns can hear singing as if their hearts would burst for very mirth and hopefulness, the blossoms beginning to push above the frosty ground, and the life breaking out of the branches that were stiff and dry all through the winter, proclaim the same truth as the Psalmist was contemplating when he spoke thus. He looks all round, and everywhere sees the signature of a loving divine Hand.

The earth is full to brimming of Thy mercy. It takes faith to see that; it takes a deeper and a firmer hold of the thought of a present God than most men have, to feel that.

Read our verses once more:

Psa 119:49  ZAIN. Remember the word unto thy servant, upon which thou hast caused me to hope.
Psa 119:50  This is my comfort in my affliction: for thy word hath quickened me.
Psa 119:51  The proud have had me greatly in derision: yet have I not declined from thy law.
Psa 119:52  I remembered thy judgments of old, O LORD; and have comforted myself.
Psa 119:53  Horror hath taken hold upon me because of the wicked that forsake thy law.
Psa 119:54  Thy statutes have been my songs in the house of my pilgrimage.
Psa 119:55  I have remembered thy name, O LORD, in the night, and have kept thy law.
Psa 119:56  This I had, because I kept thy precepts.
Psa 119:57  CHETH. Thou art my portion, O LORD: I have said that I would keep thy words.
Psa 119:58  I intreated thy favour with my whole heart: be merciful unto me according to thy word.
Psa 119:59  I thought on my ways, and turned my feet unto thy testimonies.
Psa 119:60  I made haste, and delayed not to keep thy commandments.
Psa 119:61  The bands of the wicked have robbed me: but I have not forgotten thy law.
Psa 119:62  At midnight I will rise to give thanks unto thee because of thy righteous judgments.
Psa 119:63  I am a companion of all them that fear thee, and of them that keep thy precepts.
Psa 119:64  The earth, O LORD, is full of thy mercy: teach me thy statutes.